Charlie Gard's parents want him home for final moments

Connie Yates and her lawyer arrive at the High CourtImage copyright Reuters Image caption Connie Yates and Chris Gard's lawyer said Great Ormond Street Hospital was obstructing attempts to take Charlie home

The parents of terminally-ill Charlie Gard have returned to court to seek permission to take their son home to die.

Lawyers for Chris Gard and Connie Yates told the High Court they wanted "a few days of tranquillity outside the hospital before Charlie passes away".

They ended their legal case to take him to the US for treatment after being told it was too late to help him.

Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) has not said when life support will end.

image

Media playback is unsupported on your device

Media captionChris Gard:"We are so sorry we could not save you"

Grant Armstrong said Charlie's parents "last wish is that Charlie dies at home".

He told Mr Justice Francis a portable ventilator and oxygen supply could be used for the 11-month-old baby.

Mr Armstrong added that GOSH, where he has been in intensive care since October, "says it won't stand in the parents way yet is putting up obstacles".

The judge said Great Ormond Street bosses had indicated that there were practical difficulties and had suggested a "hospice option".

He added:"These are issues which cry out for settlement."

Mediation 'refused'

Lawyers for GOSH told the judge "the hospital would like to be able to fulfil the parents wishes and if it is safe and practicable and in Charlie's best interests."

However, they said Charlie parents had not wished to use the services of a mediator and had proposed no clear plan.

"We need to balance parents needs and Charlie's best interests," lawyer Katie Gollop said.

She added the hospital wanted to fulfil Charlie's parents' "last desire" but that providing intensive care to Charlie outside a hospital setting was not simple.

The judge said:"If going home can be achieved within reason then I would like to achieve that for them."

Image copyright PA Image caption Charlie has been in intensive care at Great Ormond Street Hospital since October

Charlie's parents, from Bedfont, west London, said they have been spending their "last precious moments" with their terminally ill son.

Charlie has encephalomyopathic mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome.He has brain damage and cannot move his arms or legs.

His parents had asked Mr Justice Francis to rule that their son should be allowed to undergo a trial of nucleoside therapy in New York, a move opposed by medics at GOSH who argued the treatment would be "futile".

The Family Division of the High Court heard on Monday that US neurologist Professor Michio Hirano was no longer willing to offer the experimental therapy after he had seen the results of a new MRI scan last week.

Image copyright Featureworld Image caption Charlie's parents had raised more than £1.3m to take him to the US for treatment

In a statement to the High Court[1], GOSH said it was "increasingly surprised and disappointed" Professor Michio Hirano "had not read Charlie's contemporaneous medical records or viewed Charlie's brain imaging or read all of the second opinions about Charlie's condition".

The hospital said Professor Hirano had not taken the opportunity to see Charlie until last week, despite being offered the chance to do so by the hospital in January.

Even though the professor gave written evidence at all the court cases, the hospital said it only emerged last week that he had not read the judge's ruling following the first High Court hearing in April.

The hospital added it was concerned to hear the professor state in the witness box at the High Court hearing on 13 July that he had a financial interest in some of the treatment he proposed prescribing for Charlie.


Timeline of legal battle...

Image copyright PA
  • 3 March 2017:Mr Justice Francis starts to analyse the case at a hearing in the Family Division of the High Court in London.
  • 11 April:Mr Justice Francis says doctors can stop providing life-support treatment.
  • 3 May:Charlie's parents ask Court of Appeal judges to consider the case.
  • 23 May:Three Court of Appeal judges analyse the case.
  • 25 May:Court of Appeal judges dismiss the couple's appeal.
  • 8 June:Charlie's parents lose fight in the Supreme Court.
  • 20 June:Judges in the European Court of Human Rights start to analyse the case after lawyers representing Charlie's parents make written submissions.
  • 27 June:Judges in the European Court of Human Rights refuse to intervene.
  • 3 July:The Pope and US President Donald Trump offer to intervene.
  • 7 July:Great Ormond Street Hospital applies for a fresh hearing at the High Court.
  • 24 July:Charlie's parents end their legal fight to take him to the US for treatment.

References

  1. ^ statement to the High Court (www.gosh.nhs.uk)

Read more

Jobs for the boys? The top roles women have never had

From left to right: Baroness Hale, Jodie Whittaker, Cressida DickImage copyright PA, BBC

What do Doctor Who, the Metropolitan Police and the UK Supreme Court all have in common?

All three have recently appointed a woman in their leading role for the first time.

Baroness Hale is the latest, continuing her trailblazing career by being named as the president of the Supreme Court[1] on Friday.She followed closely behind Jodie Whittaker's headline-grabbing casting as TV's first female Doctor,[2] while Cressida Dick became the first woman to take charge of London's police force[3] in its 188-year history earlier this year.

That trio have, between them, ended 250 years of male dominance.

Yet there are plenty of renowned British institutions where a woman is still to reach the summit.Here are a selection:

Chancellor of the exchequer

The man in the job

Philip Hammond is the top dog at the Treasury - the latest in a long line of men.He was appointed in July 2016 as the government's chief financial minister.

Along with prime minister, foreign secretary and home secretary, it's regarded as one of the four great offices of state, but while the others have all had female occupants, the wait for the first female chancellor goes on.

The first chancellor listed by the government's website was Sir Richard Sackville in 1559.That's 458 years and counting...

Image copyright Reuters, PA and AFP/Getty Images

Any women contenders?

Following the Brexit referendum, Andrea Leadsom was briefly one of the favourites to become the next chancellor.Yet she had set her sights on the biggest prize - becoming prime minister.But after losing out to Theresa May, she was then overlooked for the chancellor role.

There were rumours Amber Rudd, the home secretary, was lined up for the role[4] this year - but that was seemingly dependent on the Conservatives claiming a landslide victory in June's general election.A hung parliament put paid to that.Mrs May's weakened position meant Mr Hammond kept his grip on the job.

Archbishop of Canterbury

The man in the job

In February 2013 Justin Welby became the 105th Archbishop of Canterbury, the most senior cleric in the Church of England.

It's a mere 1,420 years since St Augustine was the inaugural archbishop.

Of course a woman - the Queen - holds the title of the supreme governor of the Church, but there has not yet been a woman who has taken up that archbishop role.

Image copyright Getty Images, PA

Any women contenders?

The last time this job was vacant, a female candidate wasn't a viable proposition.Women couldn't even be considered for bishop positions.

That all changed in November 2014 when the Church of England voted to allow females into the role, following decades of wrangling over the issue.

Two months later, Libby Lane was consecrated[5] as its first woman bishop.Rachel Treweek went one step further as the Bishop of Gloucester, becoming the first female to be in charge of a diocese.[6] and the first to sit in the House of Lords.By November 2015, eight women had been made bishops.

BBC director general

The man in the job

Tony Hall has been in the hotseat since March 2013, becoming the 16th permanent director general since the BBC's creation.

Lord Reith, the corporation's founder, was the first - and the longest serving - beginning his 11-year tenure in 1927.

Any women contenders?

Not last time around - Lord Hall was approached directly for the role following the resignation of George Entwistle[7] after just 54 days in the job.The BBC Trust didn't speak to anyone else.

Helen Boaden and Caroline Thomson were strong contenders to replace Mark Thompson in 2012, before Entwistle got the nod.

Last year, Anne Bulford was named Lord Hall's second in command[8] - the first woman to be deputy director general.For rivals Channel 4 a female leader is more imminent.Alex Mahon has been appointed as their first female chief executive[9] and will take up the role in the autumn.

Governor of the Bank of England

The man in the job

Canadian Mark Carney replaced Mervyn King as the head of the UK's central bank in June 2013, becoming the first foreigner to run the institution.

In its 323-year history, there has never been a woman in charge, even though one appears on the front of all of the country's banknotes [yes, the Queen again].

Image copyright Getty, Reuters, Bloomberg

Any women contenders?

Mr Carney has led a drive to get more women in senior roles at the Bank.

Charlotte Hogg landed the newly created role of chief operating officer in 2013 and was the most senior female employee in the institution's history.Earlier this year she was appointed deputy governor and was touted as a potential successor to Mr Carney - before her sudden resignation[10] after failing to disclose a potential conflict of interest.

There has been a woman in charge of a major British bank - Ana Botin became the first female to hold that title when she became chief executive of Santander UK in December 2010.That led her to being named the third most powerful woman in Britain in 2013 by BBC Radio 4's Woman's Hour, just behind the Queen and Theresa May.

Editor of the Times

The man in the job

The newspaper's current editor, John Witherow, has been at the helm since January 2013.

Founded in 1785, the Times is one of Britain's oldest and most influential newspapers around the world, and has had 21 different male editors.It all began with John Walter, whose family owned the paper for almost 125 years.

Image copyright AFP

Any women contenders?

Emma Tucker could be in the frame when the position next becomes vacant.The former editor of Financial Times Weekend has been deputy editor at the Times since October 2013.And at sister paper, the Sunday Times, Sarah Baxter has been deputy editor for the last four years,

Women have already made the breakthrough at other newspapers.The Guardian handed the reins to Katharine Viner in 2015 - the first female editor at the paper in 194 years, while Rebekah Brooks' groundbreaking spell in charge of the Sun lasted between 2003 and 2009.And Eve Pollard, the self-styled First Lady of Fleet Street, edited two papers - the Sunday Mirror from 1987 to 1991 and Sunday Express from 1991 to 1994.

But one of the UK's first women editors, Mary Howarth, didn't exactly blaze a trail when she was appointed as editor of the Daily Mirror when it launched in 1903.No other woman has held that role since.

Labour Party leader

The man in the job

Jeremy Corbyn, one of the most unexpected winners of the party leadership in its history, was elected in September 2015.

Founded by Keir Hardie in 1906, Labour has never been led by a woman other than for brief interim periods.Margaret Beckett and Harriet Harman have both been acting leader.

Image copyright Reuters and Getty

Any women contenders?

Ms Harman was deputy leader under both Gordon Brown and Ed Miliband, but didn't run for the main job.She has since admitted she should have stood in 2010.

Women candidates have a history of doing badly in Labour leadership contests.Diane Abbott trailed in last in 2010 and the two female contenders in 2015, Liz Kendall and Yvette Cooper, came in last and second last.During last year's contest Angela Eagle dropped out before it had officially begun, leaving no women in the race.

If Mr Corbyn was to leave his position any time soon, Ms Cooper is the favourite with some bookmakers.Angela Rayner, the youngest ever shadow education secretary, has also been spoken of as a future contender.

James Bond

The man in the job

Speculation continues over whether Daniel Craig will return as James Bond, but as it stands, he is the man in the driving seat of the superspy's favoured Aston Martin.

He first appeared as 007 in 2006, succeeding the likes of Sean Connery, Roger Moore and Pierce Brosnan in one of the most sought-after roles in British cinema.

Image copyright Reuters, Getty, BBC

Any women contenders?

Gillian Anderson, of X-Files fame, has put her hat in the ring to be the next 007.Last year she tweeted, alongside a mocked-up poster of herself in the role, "It's Bond, Jane Bond".

Charlize Theron, who plays a British spy in her upcoming film Atomic Blonde, has been endorsed by fellow actor Chris Hemsworth as a future Bond.

Bookmakers certainly aren't writing off the possibility."Any female" is currently joint-seventh favourite with Ladbrokes and Coral - the same odds as Michael Fassbender....

References

  1. ^ the president of the Supreme Court (www.bbc.co.uk)
  2. ^ TV's first female Doctor, (www.bbc.co.uk)
  3. ^ first woman to take charge of London's police force (www.bbc.co.uk)
  4. ^ lined up for the role (www.telegraph.co.uk)
  5. ^ Libby Lane was consecrated (www.bbc.co.uk)
  6. ^ in charge of a diocese. (www.bbc.co.uk)
  7. ^ George Entwistle (www.bbc.co.uk)
  8. ^ Lord Hall's second in command (www.bbc.co.uk)
  9. ^ female chief executive (www.bbc.co.uk)
  10. ^ sudden resignation (www.bbc.co.uk)

Read more

Highest number of fatal police shootings for 12 years

A police cordonImage copyright PA

The numbers of fatal police shootings and deaths after police pursuits in England and Wales both rose sharply in the last year, the latest figures show.

The Independent Police Complaints Commission said there were six fatal police shootings between April 2016 to March 2017, up from three in 2015/16.

The six deaths - the highest number in 12 years - included the police shooting of Westminster attacker Khalid Masood.[1]

The number of deaths in police road traffic incidents rose by 11 to 32.

That is the biggest total for eight years.Twenty-eight of those were related to police pursuits of vehicles.

Dame Anne Owers, chairwoman of the IPCC, said the six fatal shootings occurred across six forces.

The Masood one was the only one that was terrorism-related in that period.

She said:"Investigations into three of the 2016/17 incidents are complete and, as in the great majority of firearms investigations, we have found no indication of misconduct by any firearms officer."

The National Police Chiefs Council and the IPCC will examine whether changes to police pursuit safety or training are needed after the rise in road traffic deaths, added Dame Anne.

The IPPC data also showed there were 14 deaths in police custody - the second lowest figure it has recorded....

References

  1. ^ Westminster attacker Khalid Masood. (www.bbc.co.uk)

Read more

Electric Mini to be built in Oxford

Mini production line at CowleyImage copyright PA

A fully electric version of the Mini will be built at the Cowley plant near Oxford, BMW has confirmed.

The carmaker said[1] the model would go into production in 2019, with Oxford the main "production location" for the Mini three-door model.

However, the electric motor will be built in Germany before being shipped to Cowley for assembly.

BMW said it had "neither sought nor received" any reassurances from the UK on post-Brexit trading arrangements.

Last year, the government faced questions about the "support and assurances" given to Nissan before the company announced that new versions of its Qashqai and X-Trail would be made in the UK.

And there have been reports that Toyota agreed to invest in the UK after receiving a letter reassuring the Japanese carmaker over post-Brexit arrangements.

'Vote of confidence'

About 360,000 Minis are made each year, with more than 60% of them built at Oxford.But BMW has built up an alternative manufacturing base in the Netherlands amid concerns about Britain's suitability as an export hub after Brexit.

UK Business Secretary Greg Clark hailed BMW's announcement as a "vote of confidence" in government plans to make Britain "the go-to place in the world for the next generation of vehicles".On Monday, he set out plans to invest in development of battery technology in the UK.

BMW said the move was part of a plan for electrified vehicles to account for between 15-25% of its sales by 2025.

The electric Mini will be based on the company's 3-door hatchback model.However, BMW has yet to release pictures of a prototype vehicle.

BMW employs about 18,000 staff in the UK, including the Mini plant at Cowley, the Rolls-Royce factory in Sussex and at other sites in Birmingham and Swindon.

Analysis:Theo Leggett, business correspondent

BMW says the economic case for building the electric mini in Oxford is compelling, and it's easy to see why.

This is not a brand new car, redesigned from the ground up.It's a Mini, a 3-door hatchback, which will in many ways be identical to the cars already being built at the Cowley plant.

The electric bit - the drivetrain, which includes the motor, gearbox and battery pack - will be assembled in Germany, and fixed to the rest of the car in the factory.

So it makes sense to build the new model at the same factory as the majority of existing Mini production.There is no need for a new factory or production line, meaning the size of the investment will be relatively small by auto-industry standards - in "the tens of millions", BMW says.

There is a potential spanner in the works - the new car is due to go into production in 2019, months after the UK leaves the EU.

With drivetrains being imported into the UK and many completed cars exported back to Europe, there's a risk costs could rise sharply if tariffs are introduced on cross-channel trade.

But the company insists it can only make decisions based on the current economic realities.There has been no "special deal" done with the British government, it says - and nor has it asked for one....

References

  1. ^ The carmaker said (www.press.bmwgroup.com)

Read more

Charlie Gard: Parents 'want to take him home' for final moments

image

Media playback is unsupported on your device

Media captionChris Gard:"We are so sorry we could not save you"

The parents of terminally-ill Charlie Gard are returning to court to seek permission to take their son home to die, the BBC understands.

Chris Gard and Connie Yates are expected to tell the High Court they do not want his life support to be withdrawn while he is in hospital.

They ended their legal case to take him to the US for treatment after being told it was too late to treat him.

Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) has not said when life support will end.

Image copyright PA Image caption Charlie has been in intensive care at Great Ormond Street Hospital since October

Charlie's parents, from Bedfont, west London, have been spending their "last precious moments" with their terminally ill son.

They ended their legal fight after US doctor Professor Michio Hirano told them it was now too late to treat Charlie's rare genetic condition.

Lawyers for the couple are due back in court on Tuesday afternoon.


Timeline of legal battle...

Image copyright PA
  • 3 March 2017:Mr Justice Francis starts to analyse the case at a hearing in the Family Division of the High Court in London.
  • 11 April:Mr Justice Francis says doctors can stop providing life-support treatment.
  • 3 May:Charlie's parents ask Court of Appeal judges to consider the case.
  • 23 May:Three Court of Appeal judges analyse the case.
  • 25 May:Court of Appeal judges dismiss the couple's appeal.
  • 8 June:Charlie's parents lose fight in the Supreme Court.
  • 20 June:Judges in the European Court of Human Rights start to analyse the case after lawyers representing Charlie's parents make written submissions.
  • 27 June:Judges in the European Court of Human Rights refuse to intervene.
  • 3 July:The Pope and US President Donald Trump offer to intervene.
  • 7 July:Great Ormond Street Hospital applies for a fresh hearing at the High Court.
  • 24 July:Charlie's parents end their legal fight to take him to the US for treatment.

Read more

NewsLine is a full functional magazine news for Entertainment, Sports, Food website. Here you can get the latest news from the whole world quickly.

Popular Item

Recent News